Myth-busting the Filmmaking Process

05 Jan 2024 in Into Film Awards

8 mins
Child holding clapper board that says 'the power of filmmaking'
Child holding clapper board that says 'the power of filmmaking'

The new year is upon us and with it, many new filmmaking opportunities for budding young creative talent. The Into Film Awards will be taking place this year in June, where we will be celebrating the best young filmmakers in the UK. 

The Into Awards has 10 categories to enter, so there are plenty of avenues to explore. The Awards are open to young filmmakers based in the UK aged 5-19, and can provide a gateway to the UK's thriving film industry. If your learners have an existing film, you can enter it on their behalf up until the deadline of 31 March 2024 at 23:59. And if you have an idea for a new film, then we have lots of filmmaking resources to help you along the way.

Note: You must be aged 20 or over to submit an entry - if you are aged 19 or under, please ask a parent, guardian, or educator to submit your entry on your behalf.

As we enter our 10th year at Into Film, we continue to champion the importance of filmmaking as a medium for storytelling and as a powerful tool for education. Creating a film can practically and meaningfully involve your learners in the production, fostering an appreciation for teamwork and respect for everyone's individual values and strengths. And remember, regardless of whether you get nominated or not, the act filmmaking is in itself an amazing process that hugely benefits everyone involved. At the end of the day, you've all worked as a team to make something special - that's the power of filmmaking.

"Film is so powerful, it can entertain people, make them laugh, cry, and feel every emotion out there. It can make people feel accepted in who they are, give them something to relate to and make them feel less alone. Filmmaking is also a fundamental medium for education, vital in showing different perspectives on the world and opening people's minds to new ideas."

Freya, aged 17, Into Film Award-winning filmmaker of 'Driven to Despair'

Mythbusting the Filmmaking Process 

There are many misconceptions around who can make a film, and how to go about it. We know it can be daunting to approach making a film for the first time, and it's okay to be unsure of where to start, or to feel inexperienced. The important thing is to not let that prevent you from having a go.

We're here to help dispel some filmmaking myths that might prevent young people from creating their first masterpiece, because the key point is - anyone can make a film. All you need is a camera, and in this modern world, most young people carry one around with them in their pockets every single day.

So whether fishing out an old digital camera, using a brand new bit of kit, or simply using a mobile device or a tablet, you likely already have the main piece of equipment you need. In fact, Ysbryd won the Best Live Action: 12 and Under category in 2017, and that whole film was filmed on their teacher's phone!

Below, we're busting a few more myths about the filmmaking process.

Myth - You need high level filmmaking equipment to make a film

Not in 2024 you don't! All you need is a camera, and in this modern world, most young people carry one around with them in their pockets every single day.

So whether fishing out an old digital camera, using a brand new bit of kit, or simply using a mobile device or a tablet, you likely already have the main piece of equipment you need.

In fact, Welsh film Ysbryd won the Best Live Action: 12 and Under category in 2017, and that whole film was filmed on their teacher's phone!

Myth - You need filmmaking experience to make a film

Nope! James Cameron (Titanic, Avatar) is one of the most successful directors of all time, and he never went to film school! It's important to never let fear or a lack of experience stop young people from telling their story.

Great films don't have to be shot using professional equipment, and we don't judge films based on high production values or access to top quality equipment. What's most important to us is the stories and the narrative behind the film.

Our Mini Filmmaking guides will guide you through each step:

  1. Developing your film idea
  2. Writing your script
  3. Creating a storyboard

Working with younger pupils? Our Story Builder resource, aimed at pupils aged 7-11, enables learners to develop their understanding of the basic building blocks of film and storytelling.

Filmmaking engenders a sense of responsibility and teamwork and we've been fortunate to screen some of our films in a range of places, which have led to the children's aspirations being raised - they could see themselves working at a place like Paramount Pictures which is so far removed from their daily lives.

Education Ambassador Andrew Denton, Teacher at Meadows Primary School & Nursery, Telford, England

Myth - You need a crew to make a film

Not true. While having a team of people to help you make your film can be helpful, it is by no means essential. Films don't have to be huge productions, with many moving parts and a whole crew working on them. In fact, many of our previous Into Film Award-winning films have been made by jus tone person, working alone, from their bedroom.

For those working with a wider team, our Mini Filmmaking Guides can help to assign the different roles in the production process, but never be disheartened to be working solo. Often, this can help develop problem solving skills, enhance creativity, and ensure that the filmmaker's vision stays pure.

Myth - Filmmaking won't help my students with their careers

Right now, the screen industries in the UK are crying out for more workers - in fact, they're looking for 20,000 to 30,000 more people! Being involved in making a film is one of the best ways to highlight the various job roles available in the film industry, and can help dismantle the misconception that you need a film or arts degree to work in the screen industries. There are thousands of varied jobs available, catering to countless different skillsets. Diving into a filmmaking project can help young people discover their niche.

Take a look at our Who Makes A Film? map, which identifies the breadth of different job roles and departments within film that work together to bring a story to life. Being a part of the team that wins a coveted Into Film Award is a fantastic way for budding filmmakers to kickstart their career and be a part of the thriving film and screen industry in the UK.

We hope that helps to dispel a few of the common misconceptions around filmmaking, and gives young people the confidence they need to give filmmaking a go. Visit our Awards page to find out more about the 2024 Into Film Awards, including entry criteriawhat you'll need to submit your film, and more.

This Article is part of: Into Film Awards

Articles relating to our annual Into Film Awards, including all the nominees and winners from past years.

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